Monthly Archives: April 2017

April 18, 2017

Mitigation of Construction Defect Litigation- Top 10 Construction Contract Issues

By: Rebecca W. Dow, Esq.

When negotiating a construction contract with a general contractor (GC), the owner/developer should be aware of, and address, a number of issues to attempt to mitigate or limit the risk of construction defect litigation for a residential project, including multi-family and for-rent residential apartment and senior housing projects. The standard forms of construction contract—such as the American Institute of Architects (AIA) or ConsensusDocs—are more beneficial to the contractor than the owner in many respects.  A construction contract will need to be reviewed thoroughly and revised to better protect the owner, and in the case of residential construction, should in particular, address the following top 10 key issues:

1) Scope of Work—The scope of work should be well-defined, accurate, comprehensive and identify the basic components of the project. The scope should not be based solely on the drawings and specifications, which are never 100% complete, and the contractor should agree to reasonably infer the scope of work from the contract documents to produce the intended work.  If there is an inconsistency in the contract documents or between the drawings and specifications and contract documents, the contractor should provide the better quality or quantity of the work or materials. The contractor should be required to report any errors, omissions or inconsistencies in the contract documents to the owner.   Contractor’s work should be subject to inspection by the owner, applicable city, county or governmental entities, and any third-party inspectors retained by owner or construction lender for quality assurance and quality control.  Contractor should give advance notice to owner as to specified key system installations—such as soil, foundation, acoustical, exterior, building wrap, HVAC and structural components to allow review and inspection by such third-party inspectors.

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April 11, 2017

The Dos and Don’ts of Drug Testing in Utah

By Garrett Walker

Contractors frequently encounter contract provisions requiring that they test their employees on a particular project for the presence of drugs and alcohol.  At times these provisions also purport to require disclosure to the other party of test results or other confidential information. By attempting to comply with these contract provisions, some contractors unintentionally expose themselves to claims by their prospective and current employees.  Read more >>